Coaching & Leadership Development
How to Manage Change as a School Leader

How to Manage Change as a School Leader

“Change is inevitable. Growth is optional” – John Maxwell Change is all around us. It happens every second, every minute of our lives. Yet in spite of this, change is not something many of us are comfortable with. As a result, we so often miss the inherent opportunities for growth that accompany any change process.   Within the context of school leadership, my belief is that the reason for this, is because very little if anything is done to prepare individuals for the emotional and psychological consequences of change.   As a school leader, any change that you go through, particularly if you are at the forefront of the process, requires that you take stock of what the change process is asking of you. This is a necessary first step if you are to develop the wherewithal to manage it positively, not only for yourself, but also for those that you lead and manage.   In my work with school leaders, I have come to realise that change is managed most positively when individuals understand that there are four distinct stages that they and their schools must successfully progress through.   Each stage requires a deep level of self-awareness and emotional maturity to avoid the fight or flight syndrome, or remaining stuck in an unhealthy comfort zone. The four stages are…   1. Letting go:   This is the stage where you have to: – Recognise that some or all elements of the past have served their purpose – Overcome any feelings of resistance, that may be keeping you and others stuck – Recognise that you have a choice as...
Why Well-being is NOT a Side Issue in School Performance!

Why Well-being is NOT a Side Issue in School Performance!

    Increasingly the well-being of pupils is being given greater priority in our schools. With a growing number of teachers and school leaders recognising that investing in the well-being of our pupils can help secure a positive return on their attainment and, in turn, school performance.   This has in part been driven by numerous studies – not least by Public Health England in a 2014 report, which found that “pupils with better emotional well-being at age seven had a value-added key stage 2 score 2.46 points higher (equivalent to more than one term’s progress) than pupils with poorer emotional well-being”. Meanwhile, successfully attaining GCSEs (five or more A*-C) was shown to be strongly correlated with higher levels of life satisfaction amongst young people.   Whilst the findings of such reports have been widely accepted by schools, I can’t help but wonder why the fundamentals of well-being are so rarely considered when it comes to those who are responsible for teaching and leading our children.   Why the duty of care that we show towards our children is not extended as comprehensively as it should be towards our teachers and school leaders?   What we are neglecting to see, is that the capacity that educators have for bringing out the best in our children, cannot be sustained if their well-being is not made a priority. High levels of performance can only be maintained when our teachers and school leaders are given professional development opportunities that help them to:   – Deepen their self-understanding – Develop their emotional resources – Sustain a sense of purpose and vocation – Achieve greater...