Coaching & Leadership Development
How to Manage & Develop Talent as a School Leader – Expert Interview

How to Manage & Develop Talent as a School Leader – Expert Interview

This Expert Interview is with Chartered Occupational Psychologist, executive coach, talent management expert and Integrity Coaching Associate, Barbara McCleery. 1) What is Talent Management?   Talent Management is an organisation’s ability to recruit, retain and produce the most talented employees in the job market.  Essentially, its about an organisation getting the most from its people.  Each one of us has been created with a number of talents or gifts and have the potential to perform more complex tasks or activities.   Talent management focuses on an employee’s potential; meaning an employee’s future performance.  Finding good and talented people in some cases may not be a difficult thing, but making sure they want to stay working for the same organisation is a challenge.   If someone is exceptionally good at what they do and has potential to progress in the organisation, businesses will want them to stay.  However, if the career ambitions and development needs of such talented individuals are not met, then it is likely that they will look for better opportunities outside the organisation.   The most effective organisations will link their talent strategy to the goals and aspirations of the organisation.  In other words, the organisation will make key people decisions based on what sort of people it needs to be successful going forward.   I first became interested in this topic when I assumed a role in talent management for a global bank over 15 years ago.  I was responsible for guiding the business in best managing their talented leaders.  It was an incredible rewarding job and I particularly enjoyed working closely with many of the bank’s senior talented...
Building Learning Power – Expert interview

Building Learning Power – Expert interview

This Expert Interview is with ex-secondary Headteacher, trainee therapist and Integrity Coaching Associate, Tim Small. 1. What is “Learning Power” Research and how has this become a particular area of interest for you?   “Learning power” research explores deeper into the collection of psychological traits and skills that enable a person to engage effectively with a variety of learning challenges. As an educator, I was always passionate about helping young people to become authors of their own lives.  When I came across “Learning Power” research I could see immediately that it served this same passion: it was about empowering people to learn and grow and become more independent-minded, rather than passive recipients of their education.   It is based on world-class research and its impact has been reported on in books and peer-reviewed journals for well over a decade now.  The research continues, attracting global interest, still led by Professor Ruth Crick, who was appointed to undertake the original research at the University of Bristol in 1999. Out of this research, has come the CRICK Learning for Resilient Agency (CLARA) profile.   2. What is the CLARA Profile?   The CLARA profile is a valuable tool for re-engaging young people with their sense of purpose for learning.  It treats them as ‘active agents’ in their education, rather than ‘passive recipients’. This has been shown to increase their confidence in – and responsibility for – their own learning.  Importantly, it also gives rapid feedback to individual learners, their teachers and school leaders about their own, changing learning power and patterns of learning power across the school: what needs working on, how these patterns relate to existing data, how to identify...
My Appearance on Sky News – “Headteachers are Suffering”

My Appearance on Sky News – “Headteachers are Suffering”

Note: The Link for the Video can be found at the Bottom of the Page.   Back in 2017, I was fortunate enough to be asked to appear on Sky News to share my thoughts on the Head Teacher recruitment and retention crisis.  A topic which I believe to be of fundamental importance to our education system.   In my short stint on “The Point”, I discussed  that according to three Educational Leadership organisations, English Schools may face a shortage of up to 19,000 Heads by 2022, findings which were also substantiated in a recent article in the Times.   The report and the Times article, once again, underlined how schools are struggling to retain great School Leaders, with many leaving due to a lack of nurture and support from within the profession.   Things must change!   Reading these reports affirmed my belief that so much more must be done to make the role of School Leadership sustainable.   The pace and volume of change over the past decade has led to increased ambiguity, inconsistency, insecurity and staggeringly high levels of public scrutiny and personal accountability.   The system continues to perpetuate the myth of the Teflon coated Super-Head; The leader who can turn around a school at lightning speed, and sustain their performance and motivation, amidst criticism, job insecurity and the continual sacrificing of their own needs for the sake of their school.   There must come a point where all in education recognise that Head teachers are mothers, fathers, partners. They feel hurt and pain. They experience self-doubt and worry. The Super-Head does not exist.  What...
7 New Year’s Resolutions Teachers should Make

7 New Year’s Resolutions Teachers should Make

  If you want to reach February half term without running on empty, then it is time to take a different approach to your New Year’s resolutions.   First things first: forget goal-setting. Begin with your own personal development. When you get this right, you increase the likelihood of achieving any goals that you might set for yourself in the future. So, where do you begin? 1. Get a very clear picture of you as your best self   Every teacher knows what it is like to not to feel at their best. You know what it feels like when too many early mornings and too many late nights marking and preparing have taken their toll.   The scary thing is, many teachers normalise the accompanying feelings of ill health, until it is too late. So, determine that this year will be different. Take a few moments to look back across your career and identify times when you have felt at your best. They will be there. Resolve to do everything within your power to function at this level throughout the rest of this year. 2. Befriend your inner critic   If you have already begun to think, “it’s impossible to constantly function as my best self” then this one is a must for you. Don’t let your inner critic stop you from moving forward. Often individuals give in to this voice, which prevents them from leading happy, healthy and fulfilled lives.   You may not be able to control the increasingly critical educational climate, but you can control the tone and feeling of your own inner world. Make...