Coaching & Leadership Development
The 5 Qualities of Successful Senior Leadership Teams

The 5 Qualities of Successful Senior Leadership Teams

  “Nothing Great was ever achieved alone!” Dennis Griffin   Senior leadership teams are central to the success of every school. No matter the size, no matter the make-up of the team; it is imperative that every team member not only buys into the school vision, but in addition actively works with others to enable the vision to be fulfilled.   Creating a climate in which this is achieved isn’t always easy.  Quite simply because,   “Organisations are more complex because they are made up of people who come with a range of attitudes and motivations, personal goals and ways of interacting with each other.”  Louise Stoll, Professor of Education at Bath University   Yet, despite the truth of Stoll’s  statement SLT’s have to find ways to overcome the complexity of differing attitudes, motivations and goals, so that their energies are consistently centred on working together for the common good.   From my own experience working with SLT’s those that are most effective in achieving the above, share these five qualities…   1) Shared purpose   These teams successfully lay aside ego. No team member elevates themselves above another. They are aware of one another’s strengths and areas for development and work successfully with both. The vision is important to all of them, not just the Head. They understand the role that they each play individually and collectively in seeing the vision fulfilled. As a result, a shared understanding of their ‘Why’ means that when challenges arise, they never lose their way.   Their shared sense of purpose ensures that the right decisions are made for the right reasons....
The 3 Common Mistakes that School Leaders Make

The 3 Common Mistakes that School Leaders Make

  When you become a school leader, getting to grips with everything that the role is really asking of you can be hard work.   The psychological adjustments that need to be made in order for you to fully accept and succeed at what the role is asking of you can be akin to learning to walk again.   Just as, when you were a child learning to walk, you had to be supported by your loved ones to move from a place of unconscious incompetence to unconscious competence [Maslow’s Four Stages of Learning], as a school leader you have to be supported to move to this confident place of being too.   However, many school leaders are unaware of this fact and because of this, mistakes can be made which jeopardise the fulfilment of their vision.   In particular, there are three mistakes that school leaders commonly make which could be easily avoided….   Mistake # 1: Not asking for personal support   Without support, the experience for a school leader who is growing into their role is both lonely and limiting. Progress is slow and in extreme cases stunted; neither the individual nor those they lead are able to reach the level of maturity necessary for sustained personal effectiveness.   Every school leader’s journey begins, no matter how well concealed, at the point of unconscious incompetence and it is only with time, patience, understanding and a space that facilitates personal growth, that an individual can reach the point of unconscious competence.   To avoid this mistake find seek out help that supports both your personal and professional growth.   Mistake # 2: Not recognising that...