Coaching & Leadership Development
How to Stay Resilient as a School Leader

How to Stay Resilient as a School Leader

  With the ever increasing pace of change in schools today and heightened levels of public scrutiny and accountability, being a school leader today is hard emotional and psychological graft.   When change comes along and it is fast and furious [as has been the case in the education sector], you not only have to be able to manage the huge gamut of emotions and dissenting voices that often accompany change of this nature, you also have to be able to manage your own tangled web of thoughts and emotions as you respond to meeting the emotional needs of others and this is a far from easy process.   Day after day, you give and you give. Rarely is a balance achieved between what you give to others and what you give back to yourself.  As a result your ability to remain emotionally resilient, so that you can weather the occasional storms of life as a school leader, is weakened and so too is your ability to remain socially aware so that you can maintain those relationships that will help you through the storms.   In today’s educational climate the school leaders who will succeed in their roles, will be those who know how to stay emotionally resilient and socially aware. Those who understand that if they are going to be effective in meeting the needs of others, they will have to become expert in understanding and meeting their own needs first.   So where do you begin?   Begin by understanding that school development is also about emotional development. The ability to meet the emotional needs of others...
3 Things School Leaders Could Stop Doing

3 Things School Leaders Could Stop Doing

Today’s Blog comes from an ex-secondary Headteacher, trainee therapist and Integrity Coaching Associate, Tim Small.  In my experience of working with school leaders, I’ve observed that when leaders find themselves struggling with the challenges of the role, they often have a common natural response. I often find that their reaction is to simply try and “step up”, to work harder and do more, perhaps believing if they just keep working harder, then eventually the challenges of the role will begin to subside. This is a damaging attitude that can lead Heads down a path to burn-out, where many create a larger and more unsustainable workload for themselves and exacerbate their own struggles by working far beyond their hours at the expense of their own wellbeing. On top of this, many still find that the challenges they experienced are just as present as before. Rather, I propose the best way to lighten the reality of school leadership is not to do more and more, but instead by identifying what is it that we can do less of that can best support us in our roles. In doing so, we can help create new ways of thinking and behaving that better serve us in overcoming the struggles of our role. In particular, I believe there are three things which many School Leaders could stop doing that can help make the role more sustainable and joyful… 1. Stop adding stuff to the agenda without taking anything off!   Many of us are good at initiating a new action or project when it aligns with our values and strategic vision.  We might call a meeting about it, ask someone to investigate and report back, agree to set up a working group, give...