Coaching & Leadership Development
Are you considering quitting over excessive workload?

Are you considering quitting over excessive workload?

  We all know that the role of the school leader has changed dramatically and with it too, the increased demands that many school leaders face.   Yet, I firmly believe that it would be a great loss to us all, if many of our school leaders left the profession early, before ever seeing their dreams for themselves or their schools fulfilled.   If you are considering leaving the profession early these three top tips [which I have successfully used when coaching school leaders] will help you to stop, pause and reflect and to re-consider whether throwing the towel in at this stage in your career, is really what you want to do!   1. Re-visit your Vision as a School Leader   Take some time out and reflect on the reasons why you stepped into the school leadership role. What was it that you had hoped you could achieve? What was the legacy that you had hoped to leave behind?   It takes courage to have a big vision and as a school leader, wanting to make a difference to the lives of future generations, your vision will be bigger than most! If you can find a way to re-connect with your vision, you will be able to find a way to connect with what drives you…your passion, your purpose. Often this can be enough to re-fuel a tired, worn and weary soul.   2. Reflect on your values   It is highly likely that with the challenges that have arisen as the result of the new education reforms, that there will have been times when you will have found...
5 Things Every Headteacher Should Know

5 Things Every Headteacher Should Know

  Irish poet, David Whyte understands fully what life and work are all about. He says;   “We must have a relationship with work that is larger than any job description we are given. As real work, like a real person, grows and changes and surprises us, asking us constantly for recommitment.”   If you are a school leader reading this, stop now and think deeply about his words. What is it that David Whyte is saying about the relationship that you need to have with your work?   I believe that he is pointing to key essential truths about life and leadership and the deeply personal dynamic that is so often at play, between the individual and their role, but rarely gets spoken about. A dynamic that calls for the individual (particularly if they are in a leadership position) to engage in a constant conversation with their work, about its true nature and what it is asking of them.   Having used this quote with a number of senior leadership teams and heard their deeply personal reflections on it, I have identified five key things that I believe every school leader should know about the role and what is means for their own personal/professional development…   1. Vulnerability will be a constant companion   Because the school leadership role is full of constant ‘challenges and surprises’ which so often catch you off guard, learning to accept your own feelings of vulnerability are an essential part of growing into the role.   Too many school leaders make the mistake of believing that vulnerability is a sign of weakness and...
“Growing the Next Generation” – Unleashing Potential in your MAT

“Growing the Next Generation” – Unleashing Potential in your MAT

This blog comes from Emma Bone, Executive Headteacher at the Learning Academy Partnership (LAPSW) For me, in my role as Executive Head within a MAT, excellence in leadership is fundamentally about growing the next generation of leaders and this takes time and investment. It is not a ‘quick win’ or ‘gimmick’ but investing in people and time to engage in ‘collateral learning’ pays huge dividends – stretches people outside their comfort zone and has the potential to be golden and transformational! Within a hardwired MAT, there are a myriad of opportunities to spot that emerging next layer of potential leaders and craft their pathway through the experiences that we offer them across the Trust; only made possible through a ‘deep’ knowledge of all of our schools and the way our Senior Executive Team work as one. Whilst the role of Executive Leadership is not pinned down, research commonly states that those in Executive Headship have three main strategic priorities: – Improvement (e.g. addressing school underperformance) – Expansion (e.g. increasing management capacity and efficiency) – Partnerships (e.g. forming and growing a school grouping). In order to achieve these priorities, the role must necessarily focus on: strategic thinking; school-to school consistency and collaboration; coaching and staff development (particularly, building leadership capacity); and an outward focus. Underpinning all of these these those is the building of trust and a focus on spotting and unleashing talent in order to achieve the best for all of our children. Over the last few years I have been fortunate enough to be involved in developing and facilitating an aspiring leaders programme for our Trust alongside other...