Coaching & Leadership Development
How to Support New Headteachers – Expert Interview

How to Support New Headteachers – Expert Interview

This Expert Interview is with coach, transactional analysis expert and Integrity Coaching Associate, Giles Barrow. 1) What are the challenges of being a new Headteacher?   Over the last few years, what I’ve noticed is that being a good practitioner, demonstrating many of the qualities of effective leadership is often the basis on which individuals get promoted into headship and sometimes quite early on.   One of the thresholds that needs to be understood and crossed is that there is a difference between being a good practitioner and holding leadership. A question often unasked is why would others want to be led by you? This demands of us that we understand psychological leadership.   This is where we want to be led by someone, as opposed to having to be led by them. So, some newer heads can be extremely bright and right about their vision, but soon stumble around because others are not coming with them. Being bright and right is sometimes not the point for the leader – it’s the relationship that counts.   In my experience, this can contribute to some of the common challenges that School leaders face today (particularly those new to the profession) namely…   – Isolation – Difficulties communicating and operating across teams and across the school – Issues resulting from a lack of emotional intelligence – Trying to leading from a place of influence rather than authority – Struggles in managing change effectively – Difficulties seeing the big picture and think systematically – Issues caused by a lack of honest feedback 2) How can we support New Headteachers better?   I wrote a paper on the theme of “eldership” a while ago which was subsequently published...
How to Manage & Develop Talent as a School Leader – Expert Interview

How to Manage & Develop Talent as a School Leader – Expert Interview

This Expert Interview is with Chartered Occupational Psychologist, executive coach, talent management expert and Integrity Coaching Associate, Barbara McCleery. 1) What is Talent Management?   Talent Management is an organisation’s ability to recruit, retain and produce the most talented employees in the job market.  Essentially, its about an organisation getting the most from its people.  Each one of us has been created with a number of talents or gifts and have the potential to perform more complex tasks or activities.   Talent management focuses on an employee’s potential; meaning an employee’s future performance.  Finding good and talented people in some cases may not be a difficult thing, but making sure they want to stay working for the same organisation is a challenge.   If someone is exceptionally good at what they do and has potential to progress in the organisation, businesses will want them to stay.  However, if the career ambitions and development needs of such talented individuals are not met, then it is likely that they will look for better opportunities outside the organisation.   The most effective organisations will link their talent strategy to the goals and aspirations of the organisation.  In other words, the organisation will make key people decisions based on what sort of people it needs to be successful going forward.   I first became interested in this topic when I assumed a role in talent management for a global bank over 15 years ago.  I was responsible for guiding the business in best managing their talented leaders.  It was an incredible rewarding job and I particularly enjoyed working closely with many of the bank’s senior talented...
Building Learning Power – Expert interview

Building Learning Power – Expert interview

This Expert Interview is with ex-secondary Headteacher, trainee therapist and Integrity Coaching Associate, Tim Small. 1. What is “Learning Power” Research and how has this become a particular area of interest for you?   “Learning power” research explores deeper into the collection of psychological traits and skills that enable a person to engage effectively with a variety of learning challenges. As an educator, I was always passionate about helping young people to become authors of their own lives.  When I came across “Learning Power” research I could see immediately that it served this same passion: it was about empowering people to learn and grow and become more independent-minded, rather than passive recipients of their education.   It is based on world-class research and its impact has been reported on in books and peer-reviewed journals for well over a decade now.  The research continues, attracting global interest, still led by Professor Ruth Crick, who was appointed to undertake the original research at the University of Bristol in 1999. Out of this research, has come the CRICK Learning for Resilient Agency (CLARA) profile.   2. What is the CLARA Profile?   The CLARA profile is a valuable tool for re-engaging young people with their sense of purpose for learning.  It treats them as ‘active agents’ in their education, rather than ‘passive recipients’. This has been shown to increase their confidence in – and responsibility for – their own learning.  Importantly, it also gives rapid feedback to individual learners, their teachers and school leaders about their own, changing learning power and patterns of learning power across the school: what needs working on, how these patterns relate to existing data, how to identify...