Coaching & Leadership Development
Tackling Race Equality in Schools – Press Release

Tackling Race Equality in Schools – Press Release

  Integrity Coaching, the UK’s leading provider of coaching services for school leaders established by Viv Grant in 2008, has launched a new programme designed to help schools and trusts address institutional bias and drive social change.   Nearly one-year on from the death of George Floyd and inspired by the subsequent work of the Black Lives Matter movement, Integrity’s ‘Race, Identity & School Leadership’ programme is designed for senior leaders who wish to engage in conversations about race equality and achievement, supporting them to create change for their schools, themselves and their communities.   Despite the efforts of school leaders and politicians, inequalities remain a key barrier to the success of many schools. Black Caribbean children remain consistently the lowest performing group in the country (Demie & McLean, 2017).   More than half of BAME teachers report experiencing discrimination and harassment as a result of their ethnicity (Visible Minorities, Invisible Teachers report, NASUWT, 2015). The Timpson Review of school exclusion concluded that institutional racism in schools results in discriminatory practice and shapes teachers’ expectations of behaviour (Timpson Review, 2019). 85.9% of teachers and 92.9% of headteachers in state-funded schools in England are White British, compared to 78.5% of the working age population (Institutional racial discrimination in schools report, Social Market Foundation, 2020).   Director of Integrity Coaching, Viv Grant commented:   “The profound global response to the death of George Floyd in May last year has thrust race equality and social justice firmly back into the public consciousness, and communities are looking to public figures to take the lead in social change” “As a Black woman and former...
“Sustaining a Vital Profession” – Research Report

“Sustaining a Vital Profession” – Research Report

  There is growing evidence of the deterioration of wellbeing amongst teachers and school leaders and a growing recruitment and retention crisis facing the profession.   As recently as November 2019, Education Support published its Teacher Wellbeing Survey. In this survey, over 84% of senior leader respondents admitted to experiencing high-levels of stress from the role, with over 66% of senior leaders have considered leaving.   The survey also highlighted the culture of overworking in the profession; 59% of senior leaders who completed the survey indicated they typically worked more than 51 hours per week. Meanwhile, 28% of senior leaders worked more than 61 hours per week and 11% working more than 70 hours per week.   This situation further highlights the dire situation that faces the profession, which comes after the NFER report in 2017 found that headteacher retention rates have significantly fallen since 2012.   The NFER recommended that:   ‘Leaders need practical and emotional support, as well as opportunities for peer support (such as coaching, mentoring and shadowing.)   Overview   In 2018, CollectivED, a research and practice centre at Leeds Beckett University, was commissioned by the NEU to undertake an evaluation of a year-long headteacher coaching programme.   This research came in response to this growing crisis in the profession and was the first of its kind to explore the relationship between coaching, wellbeing and leadership effectiveness amongst senior school leaders.   The coaching was provided by Integrity Coaching and funded in 2018-19 by the National Education Union (NEU). The lead researcher, Professor Rachel Lofthouse says:   “Headteachers give so much of themselves to support...
The Headteacher Wellbeing Crisis in our Schools

The Headteacher Wellbeing Crisis in our Schools

  With the recent publication of the Leeds Beckett University report into the impact of Leadership coaching in schools, we have undoubtedly reached a point where the system as a whole, needs to recognise that the personal and professional development of Headteachers go side by side.   As the report and others preceding it have cited, too many good Headteachers continue to leave the profession early or burnout, because the needs of the person in the role have been ignored.   Coaching, as this report reveals, is an essential life-support system for our school leaders and must be recognised as such, if we are to enable our Heads to stay in the profession for the long haul.   Understanding what it means to be a Head today   To understand the impact of coaching as identified by the Heads in this report, we have to understand something more about what it means to be a Headteacher today; particularly amidst cuts to school budgets and public services. Increasingly, schools are now expected to pick up the slack, with no regard to the mental health and care of those involved.   As a result, schools have found themselves on the frontline, having to address the many levels of social inequality that these policies have further amplified.   In the most disadvantaged areas, these challenges are acutely felt; as too is OFSTED’s sword of Damocles when results are not in line with or above national averages.   A daily battleground   For many Heads, education has become a battle ground. Regularly, they find themselves not only fighting for the rights of the...